A Post-Rehab Guide for Families

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Addiction is a serious problem that often requires outside intervention to those struggling with substance abuse issues, and this intervention typically comes in the form of inpatient or outpatient rehab. As the family member of a recovering addict, there are a few things that you must remember when your loved one returns home after completing a stint in rehab.

Before a Family Member Comes Home

Communicating with your loved one and his or her counselors about life after rehab often helps to ensure that the patient, his or her family members and the professional staff aiding in recovery are all on the same page when it comes to aftercare. Whether your family member is headed for a stay in sober living housing or will continue recovery through outpatient care, it is important to be aware of the actions necessary to a happy, healthy life for everyone.

While it may seem like overkill, preparing your home to accommodate a loved one just out of rehab is an absolute must. Purging your space of drug paraphernalia and keeping potentially addictive prescription medications under lock and key are just a couple of the things that need to happen before your recently rehabilitated family member returns home.

After a Loved One Returns Home

Depending on the stage of recovery that the addict in your life is at when he or she returns to live under your roof will have a major impact on what to expect during those first few days. From coping with emotional highs and lows to helping a loved one reconnect with a drug-free lifestyle, creating a safe, uplifting environment in your home is the key to successfully helping your family member readjust to life without drugs. After returning from rehab, many substance abusers also benefit from reevaluating the rules and expectations in the home.

Patience is Key

Remaining patient with the your recovering family member is vitally important. While most families set rules to prohibit intolerable behavior regarding drug or alcohol use, it may be a good idea to remain flexible on other household policies.

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